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adopt a turtle

Yes - I want to give a sea turtle a second chance at life today!

Donate

We need your help to continue our research and conservation program for loggerhead sea turtles in the Mediterranean ecosystem. Every donation will go towards our loggerhead sea turtle conservation program. Every sea turtle we tag this summer, will get a name and will be tracked online with satellites from SOCIB. This means you can follow your turtle in real time! For every turtle adopted, you will receive a Certificate of Adoption and an ALNITAK crew t-shirt.

LOGGERHEAD SEA TURTLES ARE THREATENED BY FISHING HOOKS, SHIP COLLISIONS AND ENTANGLEMENT

Our conservation work has managed to reduce sea turtle by-catch in the Spanish Mediterranean by over 95%. 

Getting caught in longlines, nets, trawls and traps is the main cause of the decline of loggerhead turtles, and the current primary threat to global populations. Loggerheads can become hooked in the mouth or another part of their body when trying to consume bait, or entangled in nets or ropes. Our conservation work at ALNITAK has aimed to reduce some of the threats facing these animals. Using satellite tagging technology and working directly with longline fishing fleets, we were able to change fishing practices dangerous to sea turtles. 

OASIS PROJECT

This summer we’re studying Mediterranean and Atlantic populations of sea turtles with our OASIS Project. We’re continuing our “tag and release” protocol. The information we receive from our “turtle oceanographers” will be used to help us establish protected areas for these animals and the ecosystem they live in. 

About the loggerhead sea turtle

 

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Caretta caretta

DIET: Carnivores. Jellyfish, molluscs, conchs, crabs, and even fish. They will eat seaweed and sargassum occasionally.

CLASS: Reptiles

AVERAGE LIFE SPAN IN THE WILD: 50 or more years

CONSERVATION STATUS: Threatened

SIZE: 190 cm    WEIGHT: 160 kg

CURRENT POPULATION TREND: Decreasing.

 

 

The worldwide population is not known, but scientists studying nesting sites are seeing a decrease. Unfortunately, populations of loggerheads have been on the threatened species list since 1978.

Loggerhead sea turtles are ancient mariners of the underwater world. They can find their way across oceans and mature females will often journey across the Atlantic Ocean to lay their eggs in the same beach where they hatched. Their shells can act as an “oasis” for fish out in the open ocean. They become encrusted with algae and barnacles during long trans-oceanic journeys, they also attract schools of small fish and even larger pelagic species, like tuna. These provide a temporary haven for open water species and make sea turtles a valuable part of the oceanic ecosystem. Loggerheads can hold their breath underwater for hours if they are resting. However, when a turtle gets entangled in a fishing net and is under stress, it can drown in a few minutes. Find out more about our research on sea turtles here.

 

THANK YOU FOR HELPING US SAVE THE LOGGERHEAD SEA TURTLE!

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With the funding and support of: